Media is packed with shiny covers and airbrushed images of celebrities we love, but the candid behind-the-scenes images that capture the unpolished truths and honest emotions of these famous faces are what show someone we can actually relate to.

Here is a time travel to the glory days of the greatest pop culture legends of all time. Incredible timeless images captured by utterly talented photographers offer a glimpse into iconic moments of celebrities‘ lives and let us feel like a small part of their intriguing world. Some of them are not with us anymore, others’ fame has vanished, but these vintage images of the biggest names of the last decades hold many memories and make us remember why these people are so special.

Morrison Hotel Gallery has collected thousands of nostalgic images featuring some of the most popular artists and events in history. It is the world’s leading brand for fine art music photography representing over 125 of the greatest music photographers and their archives.

Take the trip down the memory lane through the gallery of some rare pictures from the past you probably haven‘t seen before, to remember and celebrate icons in their golden days.

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Kate Bush, 1978

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(Ph. Gered Mankowitz)

“Meme Queen or Mastermind?
When pioneer of pop music and the now-perennial catsuit Kate Bush (@katebushmusic) hit the road on April 3rd, 1979 for what would be her only full-length tour, it’s hard to imagine the seismic impact that would accrue thereafter. Seeing now-iconic performances of unlikely hits like “Wuthering Heights” and “Strange Phenomena”, the historic 28-date ‘Tour of Life’ which featured an impressive seventeen costume changes including but not limited to those of a toile ghost, gun-toting outlaw and interpretive dancer offers fans a thinly veiled glimpse into the seldom-explored phenomenology of a peripheral pop sensation whose nymphic idiosyncrasies and ethereal sense of unselfconsciousness somehow seem to poise her as something of an internet sensation four decades later. But more than an unsung matriarch of meme culture in spandex and chiffon, it is in fact the same eccentric talent which both enthralls and unnerves that ultimately earns the singer-songwriter a permanent place in music history as the first female artist to achieve a UK No. 1 hit with a self-written song (“Wuthering Heights”). To these ends, we raise a toast to Kate Bush and all the otherworldly artists who dare to dream in shapes, colors and sounds beyond the chart-topping status quo.”

Janis Joplin and Tina Turner at Madison Square Garden, November 27, 1969

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(Ph. Amalie R. Rothschild)

“At the intersection of art and activism is today’s #WomenWhoRock honoree, Amalie R. Rothschild. Certainly making our archives all the more spectacular are the artist’s visceral photographs from the glory days of Fillmore East and the likes but perhaps more prolific yet are Rothschild’s cinematographic masterworks such as ‘It Happens to Us’, a historic 1972 short film which played pivotal role in the Supreme Court’s momentous Roe vs Wade ruling of 1973 finds present home in both the Museum of Modern Art’s permanent collection and the ongoing socio-political discourse surrounding pro-choice legislation. A multifaceted artist and advocate for intersectional feminism whose quick wit is only matched by her own unprecedented aptitude for capturing history as it happens, Rothschild is right at home in the time-honored company of legendary female artists and unapologetic sharpshooters at Morrison Hotel Gallery.”

Elton John, The Muppet Show, Elstree Studios, England

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(Ph. Terry O’Neill)

“Though the sheer thought of walking a mile in the legendary shoes of Sir Elton John (@eltonjohn) is enough to send us reeling in a grueling (albeit glamorous) tailspin, we’ve never felt a greater kindredness than in this very moment as we look on at this 1976 shot by MHG photographer Terry O’Neill (@terryoneillofficial) and the prospect of a lazy Sunday from the fabulous comfort of home.”

Yoko Ono and John Lennon, Butterfly Studios, NYC, 1972

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(Ph. Bob Gruen)

“ust two days after the golden anniversary of the duo’s Gibraltar nuptials, today sees the celebratory re-release of John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s ‘Wedding Album.’ Originally released in 1969, the couple’s third and final record is often cited as their most prolific. Featuring “Don’t Worry Kyoko” and the aptly entitled “John & Yoko”, a twenty-two minute baseline of the artists’ own heartbeat overlain with recordings of either calling out the other’s name, the album abstracts one of the 20th century’s most intense love stories from the hopeful (if not heartbreaking) vantage point of newlywed bliss. Still a far cry from fairytales which wilt in the face of certain reality, today’s half-centennial re-release featuring re-mastered tracks, photographs, drawings and more serves as an enduring reminder to music lovers and hopeless romantics everywhere of the unbreakable bonds of real love and really great artistry.”

Cher, ‘I’d Rather Believe in You’ album cover, 1976

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(Ph. Norman Seeff)

“Believe it or not, the oldest female solo artist to ever peak at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 was just fifty-three years old! Meanwhile, it should come as no surprise that the record holder is none other than the evergreen Cher (@cher) whose “Believe” reached No. 1 exactly two decades ago today on March 13th, 1999. Befitting this moment in music history and the overarching sentiments of Women’s History Month are the karaoke anthem’s lyrics of empowerment and self-sufficiency made all the more crystalline by way of the then-revolutionary innovation of Auto-Tune also fondly dubbed the “Cher effect.” Though the reigning queen of reinvention has procured a chart-topper in each decade since the 1960s, this music history milestone leaves one to wonder if her lucky streak will continue with just nine months remaining if the time-honored artist seeks to secure a No. 1 single in the decade present. Needless to say, we believe she can.”

Paul & Linda McCartney, Cover of Life Magazine, 1971

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(Ph. Henry Diltz)

“On what would otherwise be the 50th anniversary of Paul and Linda McCartney’s lifelong romance, we celebrate the former Beatle’s first great love and inspiration behind “Maybe I’m Amazed” whose legacy as having had an exceptional eye for photography, a mind for music business and a heart for activism is perhaps most poignantly expressed through this Arcadian image captured in 1971 by MHG founding photographer Henry Diltz (@henrydiltz). Of lensing this particular image, Diltz first remembers the call from friend and fellow photographer Linda asking him to join the happy couple in Malibu where he would create this portrait that went on to cover LIFE Magazine.”

Jim Morrison, Fantasy Fair, Mill Valley, CA, 1967

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(Ph. Elaine Mayes)

“‘Death makes angels of us all and gives us wings where we had shoulders smooth as ravens claws.’ In search of inspiration, a fresh start and an escape from the warrant out for his arrest in Miami, Jim Morrison flees to Paris on March 11th, 1971, taking up residence in a fourth-floor apartment at 17 rue Beautreillis. Six months later, an untimely end shrouded in mystery forces the vagabond poet to relocate once and for all to Père Lachaise cemetery where he is laid to rest in the avant-garde camaraderie of Wilde and Proust, Piaf and Chopin. Pictured here is the Lizard King at the 1967 Fantasy Fair as seen through the lens of MHG photographer Elaine Mayes who recalls, ‘I knew about The Doors before going to the Fantasy Fair. No one in San Francisco had seen The Doors at that time. The Fantasy Fair was an amazing three days on Mount Tamalpias, the very first rock festival, several weeks before The Monterey Pop Festival. We all had access to musicians then, and I was able to get very close to Jim.’”

Black Sabbath, London, 1973

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(Ph. Duffy)

“On this day in 1970, the band formerly known as Earth took to the stage at London’s widely-storied The Roundhouse for the very first time under the newly formed Black Sabbath (@blacksabbath) with a lineup consisting of Ozzy Osbourne, Tony Iommi, Geezer Butler and Bill Ward. Needless to say, this local debut would give rise to one of the most legendary shock-rock groups in music history.”

Tina Turner, Paris, 1984

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(Ph. Bob Gruen)

“Happy International Women’s Day! From the ones that raised us to those whose songs we were raised on, MHG celebrates women today and every day. And so in honor of International Women’s Day, we present a time and genre transcendent @spotify playlist of 50+ songs paying special homage to the magnanimous and marginalized femmes who have forged paths for mothers and muses everywhere, serving as constant sources of inspiration and empowerment.”

Paul McCartney with anti-Beatles Button, 1964

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(Photo c/o The Vincent Vigil Collection)

“For all the Page Six scandals and publicity stunts that seem commonplace (if not exhaustive) in this modern age of mass-media, not since the Johnson era has an artist managed to make a statement with all the provocativeness and poignancy of John Lennon (@johnlennonofficial) whose now-iconic “more popular than Jesus” remark was published in The London Evening Standard exactly fifty-three years ago today. While the remark, “We’re more popular than Jesus now; I don’t know which will go first—rock ‘n’ roll or Christianity. Jesus was all right but his disciples were thick and ordinary. It’s them twisting it that ruins it for me.”, originally gained little traction in the United Kingdom, certain chaos would ensue when the interview was republished several months later in the U.S. Though the fury of protest, radio bans, record-burning events, condemnation and crucifixion threats would eventually burn out, these events ultimately contributed to the Beatles’ decline in live performances, particularly those in the United States. Over a half century later, the great spirit of Beatlemania—as with Christianity—remains omnipresent as ever with no signs of slowing anytime soon.”

Lou Reed and Nico, 1975

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(Ph. Mick Rock)

“Here’s to the late-great Lou Reed (@loureedofficial) in honor of what would otherwise be the artist’s 77th birthday. Widely considered one of the most prolific singer-songwriters of the 20th century, Reed is perhaps best remembered for hits like “Walk on the Wild Side” and his collaborative contributions to The Velvet Underground which not only captured the visionary’s own cerebral disposition but also the general sentiments and experiences which defined New York City’s avant-garde throughout much of the 60’s and 70’s. And so, no matter where or how the late-great Lou Reed will be celebrating today’s special occasion, we’d like to imagine he’ll be spending it someplace lovely on the other side with the legendary Nico and his beloved dog, Lollabelle.”

Keith Richards and Patti Hansen, New York, 1981

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(Ph. Lynn Goldsmith)

“While much of the music world is still buzzing over the possibility of a real-life romance between Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga (@ladygaga), Keith Richards (@officialkeef) and Patti Hansen (@pattihansen) are here to remind us all what a lasting love in music history really looks like #couplegoals”

Janis Joplin, Hollywood, CA, 1970

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(Ph. Barry Feinstein)

“Released posthumously by Columbia Records (@columbiarecords), ‘Pearl’ is Janis Joplin’s swan song and easily one of the most prolific in music history, leaving little room for surprise when it began its nine-week reign at No. 1 on the U.S. album chart forty-eight years ago today. Five months after the songbird’s untimely demise, the album’s chart-topping success is enlivened with all the triumph and looming sorrow of this iconic photograph lensed by MHG photographer Barry Feinstein on the eve of the singer-songwriter’s death. A near half-century later, the record is revered far beyond a mixed bag of emotions. Boasting evergreen hits like “Me & Bobby McGee”, “Cry Baby” and “Mercedes Benz”, ‘Pearl’ continues to be celebrated as a formal masterwork of epic proportions.”

Faye Dunaway, Beverly Hills Hotel, CA, 1977

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(Ph. Terry O’Neill)

“Last night’s 2019 Academy Awards ceremony saw Spike Lee’s first Oscar win with ‘BlacKkKlansman’, Rami Malik’s unsurprising (but welcomed) win in the category of ‘Best Actor’ for ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ and an intimate performance of Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper’s “Shallow” which deservingly won the Oscar for ‘Best Original Song’–all definitive causes for (over)celebration. On that note, though this morning we might prefer the silent comfort of pajamas, a dark room and lots of fluids, the show must go on! Ahead of next week’s gallery-wide unveiling of ‘Grunge: Rise of A Generation’, we are kicking off a special Instagram takeover with Smithsonian Magazine. That said, if you are as restless as we are when it comes to keeping up with definitive moments in music history, follow along at @smithsonianmagazine between now and next Monday (3/4) as we retrospect the genre’s evolution from Seattle obscurity to international acclaim.”

The Beatles, filming ‘Help!’ Bahamas, 1965

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(Photo c/o The Vincent Vigil Collection)

“Under the working title of ‘Eight Arms To Hold You’, the Beatles began filming on location in the Bahamas exactly 54 years ago today. An immediate follow-up to 1964’s ‘A Hard Day’s Night’, the band’s sophomore feature film would first debut in London on July 29, 1965 (followed by August 25, 1965 in the United States) to rave reviews with the official and now-iconic title, ‘Help!’”

Led Zeppelin in front of The Starship, 1973

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(Ph. Bob Gruen)

“Though jam sessions have long been integral to music culture, it is on this day in music history that the proverbial pastime takes on greater precedence with the 1972 release of Led Zeppelin’s “Rock and Roll/Four Sticks.” Befitting its title, the seven-inch single meets traditional standards with a three-chord progression and tempo of 170 beats per minute despite the decided spontaneity which underscores its haphazard realization. While “Rock and Roll/Four Sticks” would only reach No. 47 on the U.S singles chart, its legacy far surpasses its quantifiable means, later defined by essayist and industry expert Robert Christagau as ‘simply the most dynamic hard-rock song in music.’”

Yoko Ono, NYC, 1973

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(Ph. Bob Gruen)

“‘Remember, each one of us has the power to change the world. Just start thinking peace, and the message will spread quicker than you think.’
Upon the timely occasion of Yoko Ono’s 86th birthday, the revolutionary artist’s message rings poignant as ever. In honor of her impressive life and career, we revisit some of our favorite excerpts from ‘Grapefruit’ (1964), a collection of meta-works or “paintings to be constructed in your head” which compound profound brilliance through simple poetics. At once a celebration and challenge of the universal human experience, Ono’s body of work encourages its spectator to envision the unseen world at large in all its infinite beauty. Whether you’ll be celebrating the living legend (@yokoonoofficial) with a visit to her recently completed NYC subway mosaic at the Dakota-adjacent 72nd Street MTA station or through your own enactment of an Ono-scored instruction painting, here’s to hoping that today’s only ‘cut piece’ be that of birthday cake.”

Gregg Allman and Cher, Los Angeles, CA, 1977

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(Ph. Norman Seeff)

“With less than twenty-four hours until sweethearts throughout the nation are expected to drop an estimated of $18.2 billion in the spirit of letting that special someone know that love is all you need, we’re setting the mood with an all-day listening session of Valentine’s Day playlists curated by our very own staff. From “Love & Love Lost” by LA Sales ManagerJamie Bucherer (@jamiebucherer) which puts all-too-relatable story to song in good humor and great taste to NYC Director of Operations Julia Oxman (@juliaoxman) whose “Peace and Love” harkens to the sun-washed glory days of free love and its curator’s own priceless affinity for the 60s, 70s and all things lovely, tap the link in bio or browse our Instastory Highlights for the round-up of Valentine’s vibes which span the whole gamut of human emotion.”

David Bowie & Aretha Franklin, Grammy Awards, NYC, 1975

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(Ph. Bob Gruen)

“Tonight, music’s biggest and brightest stars align upon the occasion of the 61st Annual Grammy Awards. Beyond the countless number of artists, moguls and music lovers that will be present, this year’s ceremony hosted by R&B legend Alicia Keys (@aliciakeys) will feature performances from the likes of Janelle Monáe (@janellemonae) and Miley Cyrus (@mileycyrus) to the Red Hot Chili Peppers (@redhotchilipeppers) and Diana Ross (@dianaross) yet, despite all of the star-studded splendor, palpable still is the absence of 18-time Grammy winner Aretha Franklin (@arethasings) who will be honored this evening with a tribute fit for a queen. Whether we’ll be seeing you there or staying tuned for the Instastories of your own a screening parties throughout the nation, you are cordially invited to join us at @sunsetmarquis throughout the month of February as we present a celebratory glimpse into some of the most time-honored albums and artists of all-time with our latest LA-exclusive exhibition, ‘Covers.’”

Bob Dylan on train from Dublin to Belfast, 1966

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(Ph. Barry Feinstein)

“Just over two weeks after its initial release, Bob Dylan peaked at No. 1 on the U.S albums chart with ‘Blood On The Tracks’ on this day in music history. Featuring hits such as “Tangled Up in Blue”, “Simple Twist of Fate” and “You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go”, the best-selling fifteenth studio album from music poet laureate would not only go on to earn double-platinum certification but also a coveted spot in the Grammy Hall of Fame…Speaking of which, if you’re anything like us, you might’ve been surprised to discover that your invitation to this year’s Grammy award ceremony was lost in the mail yet again! Nevertheless, you’re still in luck as we kick of music’s biggest weekend tonight in West Hollywood at @sunsetmarquis with the red carpet unveiling of ‘Covers: A Grammy Celebration’, a special LA-exclusive exhibition which celebrates the best albums in music history and the brilliant photographers behind their now-iconic visuals with special tribute being paid to the late-great queen of soul, Aretha Franklin (@arethasings).”

Bob Marley, Essex House, NYC, 1980

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(Ph. Ebet Roberts)

“‘Life is one big road with lots of signs. So when you riding through the ruts, don’t complicate your mind. Flee from hate, mischief and jealousy. Don’t bury your thoughts, put your vision to reality. Wake up and live!’ Happy Birthday to the late-great Bob Marley. In honor of what would otherwise be the music legend’s 74th birthday, tap the link in our bio for a special collection of photographs from the MHG archives which conjure the icon’s continued, post-humous reign.”

Keith Richards, The Rolling Stones, 1963

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(Ph. Terry O’Neill)

“Music is a language that doesn’t speak in particular words. It speaks in emotions and if it’s in the bones, it’s in the bones.” Monday mood c/o Keith Richards (@officialkeef).

Stevie Wonder, Dance Theater of Harlem, NYC, 1976

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(Ph. Allan Tannenbaum)

“Lightning may not strike twice but Stevie Wonder certainly would on this day in music history when “Superstition” earns the singer-songwriter his second No. 1 single, a decade after his chart-topping debut with “Fingertips, Pt. 2” at the age of 12. The lead single from Wonder’s fifteenth studio album, ‘Talking Book’, “Superstition” remains one of the greatest hits of all time yet perhaps still little-known a near half-century later is that the critically-acclaimed track is actually the collaborative masterpiece of Wonder and guitar legend Jeff Beck (@jeffbeckofficial) who would later recall, “The original agreement was that he’d write me a song, and in return, I’d play on his album…One day I was sitting at the drum kit, which I love to play when nobody’s around, doing this beat. Stevie came kinda boogieing into the studio: ‘Don’t stop.’ ‘Ah, c’mon, Stevie,’ I can’t play the drums.’ Then the lick came out: ‘Superstition.’ That was my song, in return for Talking Book. I thought, ‘He’s given me the riff of the century.’” Needless to say, once the mastered single was played for Motown Records who insisted on Wonder having first dibs, there was a definite change in plans. Though each artist would find commercial success with his own version of the song, history continues to celebrate Stevie Wonder’s “Superstition” as the true original.”

Robert Mapplethorpe and Patti Smith, New York City, 1969

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(Ph. Norman Seeff)

“When Art Went on Trial | In an effort to impose stricter content restrictions on federally funded art, former North Carolina senator Jesse Helms took his fears and fantasies (particularly their exacerbation through the body of work of Robert Mapplethorpe) to trial in 1990. Throughout the now-historic hearing which would bring to the forefront national sentiments regarding art censorship, AIDS activism and the dangerous projections of the human psyche, Helms posed a number of erroneous and often explicit claims against the “obscene” artist in demand of censorship which essayist Richard Meyer has since poignantly and prolifically dismissed in such writings as his 2003 “The Jesse Helms Theory of Art” –which is definitely worth a read. But in truth, Mapplethorpe may be the sum of all and none of these claims and perhaps therein lies his brilliance. Following the widespread success of Patti Smith’s ‘Just Kids’, the artist has seen a posthumous resurgence of Lazarus proportions as the subject of a major retrospective at the Guggenheim Museum (@guggenheim) entitled, “Implicit Tensions: Mapplethorpe Now” which opens today, just over a month shy of the March 1st release of a forthcoming and highly-anticipated ‘Mapplethorpe’ biopic. Whether or not you’ll be indulging in any of these must-see celebrations of the artist’s life work, be sure to stop by your nearest MHG location for an up-close look at this and other exceptional portraits featuring the late-great Robert Mapplethorpe by MHG photographer Norman Seeff (@normanseeff).”

David Bowie, The Man Who Fell to Earth, 1975

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(Ph. Geoff MacCormack)

“Forty-three years ago today, David Bowie releases his tenth studio album, ‘Station to Station’, a vessel for more than just hits like “Golden Years”, “Stay” and “Wild Is the Wind.” With the record’s January 23, 1976 release, the world is definitively introduced to the Thin White Duke, the artist’s last great persona which earns namesake with the album’s title track. A zoot suited iconoclast whose razor-sharp tailoring is matched only by his acerbic wit, the alter-ego’s realization neither begins or ends with the album in discussion but rather finds its genesis a year earlier with the stage visuals of the acclaimed ‘Young Americans’ Tour of 1975 before coming into full realization in the likeness of Thomas Jerome Newtown, a titular humanoid played by Bowie in Nicolas Roeg’s 1976 film, ‘The Man Who Fell to Earth.’ While the role may provide ostensible stand-in for an extended metaphor which blurs previously made distinctions between the late Ziggy Stardust and the sharply-dressed persona of present, the ephemerality of each out-of-this-world performance ultimately contributes to the time-honored brilliance of their puppet master, the truly incomparable David Bowie (@davidbowie).”

Audrey Hepburn, 1967

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(Ph. Terry O’Neill)

“Following this morning’s announcement from @theacademy, we‘d like to congratulate Rami Malek (Bohemian Rhapsody), Hannah Beachler (Black Panther), Yalitza Aparicio (Roma) and all of the other nominees whose excellent contributions to the art of cinema will be honored next month at the 91st Academy Awards ceremony. Nonetheless, you’re all already winners as far as we’re concerned so in other awards season news, we turn our attention to January 22nd, 1954 when the Golden Globe for ‘Best Performance By An Actress In A Motion Picture – Drama’ was awarded to none other than actress Audrey Hepburn for her breakout starring role in William Wyler’s ‘Roman Holiday.’ Naturally, Hepburn would come to accumulate countless additional awards and recognitions on her way to earning international acclaim as a timeless icon through performances in other classic films such as ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s’, ‘Funny Face’ and ‘How to Steal A Million’ but according to Hepburn herself, her most important role of all was that of a humanitarian, working most closely with UNICEF as a Goodwill Ambassador. Looking back on her long and prolific life, the late-great Audrey Hepburn once professed, ‘As you grow older, you will discover that you have two hands: one for helping yourself, the other for helping others.’”

Ozzy Osbourne, Black Sabbath, 1984

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(Ph. Lynn Goldsmith)

“Prior to January 20th, 1982, Ozzy Osbourne’s ‘Prince of Darkness’ moniker was more performative than practice but that all changes on this day in music history when an otherwise routine stop on the former Black Sabbath vocalist’s ‘Night of The Living Dead’ solo tour goes from bad to worse to legendary. Calling into question all preconceived distinctions between life, art and theatre, the “Crazy Train” artist’s characteristic yet still less-than-palatable food fight of over twenty-five pounds of pig intestines and calf livers is brought to a halt when he pauses to retrieve the even-more-unusual ammunition that has been flung to his feet by one concert-goer. In a bold move of sardonic humor, he picks up the rubbery prop bat and proceeds to bite off its head only to discover that this is neither rubber or a prop at all but rather an actual bat. Naturally, fans and critics were (and continue to be) equally horrified and intrigued by the shocking stunt but it’s hard to imagine that anyone was quite so alarmed in that moment as Osbourne himself who was promptly rushed to a nearby hospital and treated for rabies. In the thirty-seven years that have since transpired, much has changed for the 70 year-old rocker and grandfather of three whose ongoing farewell tour will conclude this July in Los Angeles yet what remains sealed in blood is the timeless legend of Ozzy Osbourne (@ozzyosbourne), the one and only true ‘Prince of Darkness.’”

Gloria Steinem, Palm Beach, FL, 1971

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(Ph. Al Satterwhite)

“‘I have met brave women who are exploring the outer edge of human possibility, with no history to guide them, and the courage to make themselves vulnerable that I find moving beyond words.’ Gloria Steinem (@gloriasteinem)
Tomorrow, millions of Americans take to the streets to lend their voices and limbs to the rights of women everywhere with nearly three-hundred #WomensWave marches scheduled throughout the nation. Today, it seems only fitting that we reflect upon those revolutionaries who have paved the way in camaraderie with the history-makers of present to whom we extend our utmost gratitude.”

Mick Jagger and John Lennon, Abbey Road Studios, London, 1967

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(Ph. David Magnus)

“On this day on music history, a bidding war is sparked by international music/entertainment memorabilia auction house Cooper Owen with the premature announcement of a recently uncovered 1974 cover of Willie Dixon’s “Too Many Cooks” by John Lennon (@johnlennonofficial) and Mick Jagger (@mickjagger) slated to make its way to auction a month later on February 20th, 2003. Though other versions of the legendary cover have appeared on several Rolling Stones (@therollingstones) ‘Best Of’ compilations sans Lennon, the particular recording in discussion would never make it to auction due to complications spurred by the fact that each member of the iconic yet unlikely duo was represented by different record labels. Consequentially, the coveted acetate record said to have been produced during the former Beatle’s widely-storied “Lost Weekend” era remains unheard and under ambiguous lock & key to this day.”

David Bowie, “Keep Your ‘Lectric Eye”, 1973

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(Ph. Masayoshi Sukita)

“‘All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players: they have their exits and their entrances; and one man in his time plays many parts…’
When Shakespeare penned this now-iconic line, he might as well have been prophesying a world forever redefined by the theatrical genius of David Bowie (@davidbowie). Upon the star-studded occasion of what would otherwise be the artist’s 72nd birthday, we reflect upon the life’s work of a manifolded legend. Though the visionary’s catalogue of conceptual personas included the likes of Aladdin Sane, Major Tom, the Thin White Duke and perhaps most recognizable of all, Ziggy Stardust, it’s no secret that Bowie’s life lived is an enigmatic masterpiece in and of itself. Indeed, the world looked on at the trappings of each otherworldly alter-ego with dropped jaws and starry eyes yet at the altogether human core of each is the fragmented, meta-autobiographical commentary of a pop cultural conduit of celestial proportions. Challenging socio-political norms of gender, celebrity and identity, it would be shortsighted to simply prescribe the artist to having been ahead of his times when, in fact, he was their poetic subverter all along. Timely and topical as ever, Bowie is revered as having revolutionized the role of the socially-engaged performer, liberating himself, his fans and countless contemporaries who continue to follow in his avant-garde footsteps. Three years since his physical departure from this planet and into the great unknown, this world continues to celebrate the progressive memory of one of the most prolific pop cultural figures of all time, a canonical masterpiece on par with the likes of William Shakespeare and Leonardo da Vinci. Happy Birthday, David Bowie; may God’s love be with you and may the view be a beautiful one, wherever you are”

John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Central Park, NYC, 1980

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(Ph. Allan Tannenbaum)

“Albeit released on November 17th to lukewarm reviews just three weeks prior to Lennon’s untimely death, John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s now-iconic ‘Double Fantasy’ is catapulted to international acclaim thirty-eight years ago today, peaking at No. 1 on the US Album chart on December 27, 1980. Staying at No.1 for eight weeks, the seventh and final studio album to be released during Lennon’s lifetime featuring fan favorites like “Dear Yoko”, “Yes, I’m Your Angel” and “I’m Losing You” in addition to hit single “(Just Like) Starting Over” goes on to win the 1981 ‘Album of the Year’ at the 24th Grammy Awards.”

Amy Winehouse, London, 2004

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(Ph. Jake Chessum)

“Segueing from all of yesterday’s holiday festivities and back to today‘s regular gallery hours, we’re featuring Amy Winehouse’s ‘Back to Black’ which was named 2007’s best-selling album of the year on this day in music history. Just eleven years ago today, the album had already sold several million copies worldwide, achieved five platinum sales awards and earned Winehouse six Grammy nominations including “Song of The Year.” Featuring such hits as “Rehab”, “Love Is A Losing Game”, “Tears Dry On Their Own” and “Some Unholy War” among others, the record is not only revered as one of the greatest in contemporary music history but also as the masterwork of an artist taken entirely too soon to be fully realized.”

Dolly Parton and Mick Jagger, Bottom Line Concert, May, 1977

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(Ph. Allan Tannenbaum)

“This year, invest in a new holiday tradition by trading in the boughs of holly for a little Mick + Dolly. Whether you’ve been contemplating treating yourself to a limited edition print featuring your favorite iconic duo or the perfect gift for the better half of yours, consider this your official reminder that this the final week to snag a last-minute gift from MHG that is sure to put a smile on the face of the music lover in your life.”

The Jackson 5, Encino, CA, 1974

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(Ph. John R. Hamilton)

“In perfect harmony and synchronized choreography, The Jackson Five made their television debut exactly 49 years ago today when they appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show. Catapulting the sibling quintet to international acclaim, their set which began with a cover version of Sly and the Family Stone’s “Stand!” also included originals “Who’s Loving You” and “I Want You Back.” Though the pivotal moment in music history is largely accredited to Diana Ross who was not only in the studio audience that evening but announced by Sullivan as the one who discovered the young, talented family band. However, music history reminds us that it was actually “Empress of Soul” Gladys Knight who first brought the Jackson 5 to attention of Motown record exec Berry Gordy.”

Boy George, New York City, 1993

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(Ph. Catherine McGann)

Frank Sinatra, Capitol Records, Hollywood, CA, 1956

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(Photo c/o Frank Sinatra Estate)

“Happy 103rd birthday to a man of many hats and talents, the truly incomparable Mr. Frank Sinatra. Chairman of the Board, leader of the Rat Pack, Ol’ Blue Eyes, Sultan of Swoon, the Voice, role model and to a lucky few, Dad. No matter what you call him, it’s no secret that at the all-encompassing core of the @sinatra legacy is a timeless star quality of unprecedented proportion which beams all the more radiantly at this most wonderful time of year.”

Lana Del Rey, Carson, CA, 2017

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(Ph. Adam Elmakias)

Jim Morrison, Los Angeles, CA, 1969

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(Ph. Henry Diltz)

“Of wild heart, wicked mind and tendrils curled to his collarbone like an unshaven Botticelli, the mystique of Jim Morrison may immortalize the singer-songwriter as a rock deity of sorts but upon the occasion of what would otherwise be his 75th birthday, we remember the life‘s work of an artist whom is to us something of a patron saint. A namesake and major inspiration of ours at the intersection of art, music, poetry and philosophy, Jim’s legacy is continued by the Morrison Hotel Gallery family and music fans everywhere. Long live the Lizard King!”

Stevie Nicks, Fleetwood Mac at JFK Stadium, Philadelphia, 1978

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(Ph. Steve Joester)

“With no shortage of certain hits or speculative buzz surrounding the band’s recent reformation, a perfect spell is being set in motion all along the Pacific Coast as “An Evening With Fleetwood Mac” moves southbound to Inglewood’s The Forum (@theforum) for three nights of chart-topping enchantment. In anticipation of next week’s spellbinding return, twirl over to the link in our bio or your nearest MHG location for an up-close look at this and other gold dust highlights which comprise the half-century strong charm of Fleetwood Mac.”

Elizabeth Taylor, Culver City, CA, 2000

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(Ph. Timothy White)

“Congratulations to MHG partner/photographer Timothy White (@timothywhite) on his recent nomination to the New Jersey Hall of Fame! Beyond a glimpse into the cheeky brilliance beheld by White’s celebrated body of work, may this 2000 shot of screen legend Elizabeth Taylor serve as incentive that, with your vote, Timothy just might personally return the favor with a reenactment on the NJHOF Red Capet.”

Paul Newman, Burbank, CA, 1958

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(Ph. John R. Hamilton)

Liza Minnelli, NYC, 1996

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(Ph. Timothy White)

“Fifty-two years ago today, “Cabaret” opens on Broadway at the illustrious Broadhurst Theatre with an impressive 1166-performance run. Though originally brought to life on stage by actress Jill Haworth, the musical’s leading role is perhaps best remembered in the likeness of dynastic tour de force Liza Minelli who brings the character to the screen in 1972, making household names of both “Sally Bowles” and Liza herself. A testament to the undeniable camp appeal of the restless icon who remains something of a rock legend in her own right, photographer Timothy White recalls ‘I went into the make-up room and asked Liza if she would be photographed with two tattooed friends of mine. My idea was to have their tattooed arms wrapped around her without showing the guys. When she stepped out of the dressing room and got onto the set, she asked me if I was ready. She then quickly pulled up her blouse revealing a small tattoo under her breast, surprising us all. It was the first shot of the day.’”

Freddie Mercury & Mick Rock, Date Unknown

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(Ph. Mick Rock)

“In anticipation of tomorrow’s return to SoHo for the public unveiling of ‘Killer Queen’, our tour concludes with a detour to the glory days of The Anvil at 500 W 14th, a onetime mecca for LGBTQ nightlife and the little-known origins of Freddie Mercury’s signature mustachioed aesthetic. MHG photographer @therealmickrock remembers, ‘The most infamous gay bar in New York in the mid to late 70s was The Anvil. On one of my visits to New York, I met up with Freddie Mercury. Must have been 1976 or 1977. I believe I was working on Lou Reed’s ‘Rock n Roll Heart’ album cover and the tour with the multi TV backdrop that promoted it. I hadn’t been to the Anvil previously, but being a very curious individual I was quite happy to accompany Freddie. He assured me there was a lot to see and it wasn’t like anything one could find in our hometown, London! Which turned out to be an understatement!

There were dancers on the bar and small stage and one of them had this great moustache. He was topless and also wore a leather cap and leather shorts with suspenders. Freddie was very taken by his look. He commented favorably about it to me.
The next time I saw this individual he was as a member of the Village People! I believe he was billed as Glenn Hughes. And a year or two later Freddie had adopted the moustache and cap and leather shorts as one of his stage attires. The one time I talked to Glenn was after a gig and he was very tickled at having influenced the great Freddie Mercury!!’”

Cyndi Lauper, 1984

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(Ph. Richard E. Aaron)

“For today’s moment in music history, once more we turn our attention to the Billboard Hot 100 which had its coveted top three spots filled for the very first time by three female soloists on October 25th, 1986. Landing at No. 3 was Janet Jackson with “When I Think of You” whereas Tina Turner’s “Typical Male” stood as No.2 while the No. 1 title spot went to the ever-vibrant Cyndi Lauper with “True Colors”, a time-honored classic. Exactly thirty-two years later, this trifecta of extremely talented women remain empowered as ever with Lauper’s Tony Award-winning ‘Kinky Boots’ which continues into its fifth year on Broadway where it will be joined by #TINATheMusical next fall following its present run on London’s East End. Meanwhile, Jackson remains an undisputed front-runner with her recent nomination to the 2019 @rockhall.”

Roger Moore, 1973

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(Ph. Terry O’Neill)

“Happy birthday to the late-great Sir Roger Moore! Though best known for bringing to life the dangerously suave playboy and British secret intelligence agent of Ian Fleming’s now-classic James Bond 007 franchise on screen seven times over, lesser known is the English actor’s humble beginnings as an extra in Brian Desmond Hurst’s ‘Caesar and Cleopatra’ (1945) starring Vivien Leigh. Nevertheless, Moore is perhaps better remembered for the roles he played much later in his career as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador and an honorary Commander of the Order of the British Empire. And so in honor of what would otherwise be the actor/humanitarian’s 91st birthday, it seems only fitting that we share this timeless shot lensed by our very own Terry O’Neill and some choice words from Moore himself on coming to terms with life’s ephemerality; “You can either grow old gracefully or begrudgingly. I chose both.” Let us know your favorite Bond quote in the comments below.”

Elvis Presley, Miami, FL, 1956

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(Ph. Charles Trainor)

“‘Love me tender, love me sweet. Never let me go, you have made my life complete…’ | On this day in 1956, Elvis Presley’s “Love Me Tender” entered the US singles chart, beginning a record-breaking 19-week climb to the coveted No. 1 spot where the ballad would come to stay for five weeks before being unseated by Guy Mitchell’s “Singing The Blues.” Recorded for the 20th Century Fox film of the same title, “Love Me Tender” is an adaptation of an 1861 Civil War song entitled “Aura Lee” which has since been covered by the likes of Nat King Cole, Johnny Cash, Julie Andrews, Linda Ronstadt, Frank Sinatra, Jim Morrison, Barbara Streisand and Norah Jones among countless other contemporary icons.”

Cher, 1976

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(Ph. Norman Seeff)

“Women have to harness their power – it’s absolutely true. It’s just learning not to take the first no. And if you can’t go straight ahead, you go around the corner.” – Cher

Billy Idol, Max’s Kansas City, NYC, 1978

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(Ph. Ebet Roberts)

“Tonight, @billyidol returns to the West Coast for what is shaping up to be the weekend’s must-attend happening. In anticipation of the “Rebel Yell” vocalist’s @caljamfest performance, we turn our attention to this 1978 snapshot from the full-headed glory days of Max’s Kansas City, punk rock and Generation X as seen through the lens of our very own Ebet Roberts.”

Debbie Harry, late 1970s

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(Ph. Chris Stein)

“BELIEVE WOMEN.”

Steve Jobs, Woodside, CA, 1984

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(Ph. Norman Seeff)

“Manus x Machina |September 16, 2018. At first glance, today’s date may behold no greater significance to you than the other 364 yet a closer look at the iPhone currently poised in the palm of your hand will reveal a history more closely related that it may seem. By chance or calculated choice, today’s date marks not one but two polar milestones in the fortuitous career of @apple founder Steve Jobs. On September 16, 1985, Jobs quits the company he co-founded in 1976 before returning exactly twelve years later on September 16, 1997 as Apple’s interim CEO or iCEO, effectively making Jobs the first release in a whirlwind succession of “i” products. Pictured here are the mortal forefather of and definitive predecessor to Jobs’ epochal brainchild, the iPhone.”

Rod Stewart

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(Ph. Terry O’Neill)

“You Wear It Well || Camouflage connoisseur or rockstar brother of Cruella Deville, singer-songwriter Rod Stewart peaked at No. 1 on the singles chart exactly forty-six years ago today with “You Wear It Well.” In spite of critics’ claims of an arrangement too similar to that the previous year’s “Maggie May”, this chart-topper would prove a time-honored singular sensation, reprised countless times over the years not only by Stewart but also a number of noteworthy covers by The Alan Caddy Orchestra, UB40 and Sean Costello among others.”

Carly Simon, 1981

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(Ph. Lynn Goldsmith)

“‘Electricity,’ writes Carly Simon of her relationship with Mick Jagger in her 2015 memoir ‘Boys in the Trees’, “That’s what it was.” For five decades, that spark has seemed little more than a singular sensation which both begins and ends with Jagger lending background vocals to Simon’s breakout hit, “You’re So Vain.” Yet thanks to the devoted efforts of one collector of Rolling Stones paraphernalia, the dynamic rendezvous between two rock legends is rekindled a near half-century later with the recent discovery of “Fragile”, a duet recorded during that fateful “You’re So Vain” studio session of 1972, presumed lost and acknowledged only in passing by Simon before now. Beyond the several-second teaser that can be found via a quick google search or visit to @carlysimonhq’s most recent Instagram post, there’s no word on what will come of the aged eight-track of sleepy vocals from an otherwise long-lost early morning in the studio but the slow-burning ballad’s sheer existence suggests a promising heirloom of music history that we can’t wait to plug into.”

John Lennon, The Beatles, UK, 1965

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(Photo Duffy © Duffy Archive)

“Riddle: What do John Lennon and the international Space Race have in common?

Sure, each was already a major news cycle star by August 23rd, 1974 but it is on this particular day in history that their two worlds first truly collide when a police report filed by John Lennon would go on to occupy front pages nationwide with countless headlines detailing the Beatles founding member’s claim of an extraterrestrial encounter at his NYC apartment. Giving his testimony shortly thereafter to Andy Warhol’s @interviewmag (which only recently went out of publication), Lennon recounts, “I was lying naked on my bed, when I had this urge so I went to the window, just dreaming around in my usual poetic frame of mind. … There, as I turned my head, hovering over the next building, no more than 100 feet away was this thing with ordinary electric light bulbs flashing on and off round the bottom, one non-blinking red light on top.” And so, upon the 44th anniversary of the alleged star-crossed UFO sighting which just so happened to take place during the artist’s notoriously drug-addled “lost weekend” with assistant/girlfriend May Pang, this 1965 portrait of Lennon holding the ‘UFO Detector’ that he had recently bought at a novelty store in NYC which had lights that would flicker intermittently much to the amusement of photographer Duffy and his studio crew is only fitting. Albeit a great prop, the verdict is still out on just how handy the device proved during the whole extraterrestrial ordeal.”

Robert Plant, Led Zeppelin, 1970

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(Ph. Peter Simon)

“With hair curling to his bare collarbone like an unshaven Botticelli, the ever-ethereal charm of Led Zeppelin frontman Robert Plant is eclipsed only by his booming vocals which have mystified music lovers and fellow musicians alike in a career spanning nearly five decades and counting. A vanguard of the “rock god” archetype, Plant’s reign continues today with a recently extended slate of upcoming North American tour dates for Robert Plant & The Sensational Space Shifters’ 2017 album, ‘Carry Fire’, but in celebration of the hardworking rock hero’s 70th birthday, we’re putting followers to the test with a pop quiz. Swipe through our story to see how well you *really* remember some of the rock & roll megastar’s finest and most formative moments.”

Brigitte Bardot, Cuautla, Mexico, 1964

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(Ph. John R. Hamilton)

“‘The unbearable heat continued throughout filming, and the only respite allowed Brigitte was the little water bucket she used to cool her feet.’ -John R. Hamilton, photographer | Cooling off on the 1964 set of Louis Malle’s ‘Viva Maria!’, actress Brigitte Bardot perfectly encapsulates the sense of contempt and sweat-beaded exhaustion currently felt nationwide in the face of the year’s highest temperatures. For those looking to step into the week without breaking a sweat, come by MHG for the A/C but stay for some of music and cinema history’s most exquisite moments captured on candid camera.”

Mick Fleetwood, West Africa, 1981

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(Ph. Richard E. Aaron)

“Bon voyage! Kicking off the new month on a new coast, we set sail with @mickfleetwoodofficial as he embarks from his MHG Maui outpost (@fleetwoodsgeneralstore) to our Los Angeles gallery location in anticipation of the Saturday night arrival of ‘An Evening with Mick Fleetwood.’ With just two days left until the exclusive one-night-only affair of storytelling, music and full-sensory indulgence presented in collaboration with the illustrious @sunsetmarquis, be sure to tap the link in bio for tickets before it’s too late. In the meantime, stay tuned for more updates and sneak peeks into this weekend’s most highly-anticipated event!”

Courtney Love, New York City, 2009

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(Ph. Clay Patrick McBride)

“Not since Gertrude Stein’s penning of the term “lost generation” has a figure in recent memory come to embody the avant-garde appeal of apathetic youth quite like grunge queen Courtney Love, a convoluted masterpiece of her own creation. In celebration of the 53rd birthday of an artist who has excited, disgusted, inspired and entertained us (oftentimes all at once) over the course of a career spanning three decades and counting, we reflect upon an impressive body of work which proves far more than the sum of publicity stunts and ill-fated romance. In the years to follow the 1989 formation of seminal 90s rock band Hole, the endearingly brash icon and lead singer/guitarist would not only lend slow-burning vocals to diamond-hard hits like “Celebrity Skin”, “Doll Parts” and “Awful” but also manage to define an entire generation in the process. With her message of unapologetic empowerment and an all-American sweet-tart aesthetic of satin slip dresses and torn fishnets, tiaras and combat boots, the sinewy blonde rocker is truly in a league all her own. Love her or hate her, it’s hard to deny the indelible impact that the incomparable @courtneylove wields over music culture.”

Tupac Shakur, New York City, 1993

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(Ph. Danny Clinch)

“In honor of what would otherwise be the 47th birthday of rap legend Tupac Shakur, we raise a tallboy toast to the prodigal son of West Coast rap culture with what is perhaps the artist’s most iconic portrait, lensed in 1993 by the incomparable @dannybones64. Rendered timeless by an untimely end around which much remains storied, it remains hard to imagine the hip-hop world without the imprint of the ‘Thug Life’ visionary’s effortless style, urgent sound and defiant charm, vanguarding the genre’s socio-political undercurrent. Today, @2pac’s lauded body of work continues a frequent source of reference for his contemporaries, not simply as a point of departure but one of return, retaining a time-honored yet topical sense of poignancy.”

Whitney Houston, NYC, 1990

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(Ph. Timothy White)

“Just ten days after its initial release, ‘Whitney’ peaks at No. 1 on the charts on June 12th, 1987 where it would remain for six consecutive weeks. Producing more than hits like “I Wanna Dance With Somebody (Who Loves Me)” and “So Emotional”, the eponymously titled sophomore studio album would also earn the late-great Whitney Houston record-breaking acclaim as the first female artist to have both an album and each of its first four singles debut at the top of the charts. Catapulting the pop diva into international fame, ‘Whitney’ would be certified as a 9x platinum record with over twenty-million copies sold worldwide. Today, Houston is remembered not only as the most awarded female act of all-time but as one of the most dynamically talented divas that the world has ever known.”

Bruce Springsteen, Darkness Cover – Full Frame, 1978

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(Ph. Frank Stefanko)

“In conjunction with the release of ‘Darkness on the Edge of Town’, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band embarked on the ‘Darkness’ tour forty years ago today. Beginning on May 23, 1978 in Buffalo, NY, the North American tour would run through the year’s end, leaving in its wake widespread acclaim and an icon thoroughly realized. While the album itself would not be released until June 2nd, eight stops into the tour’s 115-show run, its legacy is immediately crystallized both as the first tour to see Springsteen’s evolution into sold-out arenas but also through this 1978 image lensed by MHG photographer @frankstefanko that would appear as the album’s cover. Beyond its sheer iconology, the brilliance behind this image lies within the visual language of Stefanko’s decision to photograph the artist in his own home in Springsteen’s hometown of New Jersey, the measurable essence of a rising star. Since, this photograph has been featured in countless publications and more recently re-released for the cover of the 2016 ‘Darkness’ deluxe box collection.”

Nirvana, 1993

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(Ph. Jesse Frohman)

“When Seattle grunge staple OK Hotel welcomed to the stage a little-known local band that went by the name of ‘Nirvana’ on April 17th, 1991 to perform “Smells Like Teen Spirit” for the very first time, it’s hard to imagine that the group itself or anyone in attendance could grasp the impact that the song would soon have on the music world. Going on to become to lead single of the band’s sophomore album, “Smells Like Teen Spirit” captured the essence of an entire generation. 27 years later, the anthem for apathetic teens is remembered as one of the most celebrated tracks in contemporary rock history.”

Michael Jackson and The Jackson 5, 1970

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(Ph. Lynn Goldsmith)

“On this day in 1970, a little-known group by the name of The Jackson 5 made its television debut on American Grandstand, going on to become as ubiquitous with pop culture as Andy Warhol by 1981 when their two worlds would collide. Pictured here is the fateful moment of pop music’s royal family on their famed Triumph Tour, joined backstage by the father of pop art and MHG photographer @lynngoldsmith three years prior to Warhol’s now-iconic portrait of Michael being featured on the March 1984 cover of TIME magazine.”

David Bowie and Elizabeth Taylor, 1975

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(Ph. Terry O’Neil)

“In anticipation of this Friday’s public unveiling of BOWIE, we’re starting our week with a moment shared between two fast friends captured by legendary photographer Terry O’Neill. The mutual friend of both David Bowie and Elizabeth Taylor, O’Neill agreed to set up this 1975 meeting at the request of Taylor who wanted Bowie to audition for a role in her latest film, The Blue Bird, set for release the following year. According to the photographer, as a result of the Starman himself being over two hours late, “Liz was pretty annoyed and on the verge of leaving but we managed to persuade her to stay.” Nevertheless, Bowie did eventually arrive, even managing to win the actress over in the process with his inescapable charm, we can only presume. While he never did go on to be featured in the film, he and Taylor would remain lifelong friends and we have this image to remember the unlikely duo by. See this among other outstanding moments from the life and career of David Bowie on view at all three Morrison Hotel Gallery locations starting this Friday, February 23rd. ”

Madonna, 1980

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(Ph. Mick Rock)

“On this day in 1985, Madonna’s hit single “Like a Virgin” reached #1 on the Billboard charts where it would stay for three weeks. We’ll be celebrating the occasion all weekend long, starting with this 1980 image.”

Jay Z, 1988

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(Ph. Timothy White)

“Congratulations to Jay-Z for the release of his new album “4:44.” The performer has decided to postpone his tour until the fall so he can spend time with his wife, 5-year old daughter, and new born twins.

This photo was taken by Timothy White in 1988 when Jay-Z was only 19 years old. 8 years later he would release his first album “Reasonable Doubt.”

Marilyn Monroe

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(Ph. Milton H. Greene)

“Some Like It Hot- A photographic exhibition and never before seen, behind-the-scenes footage of Marilyn Monroe by Legendary photographer Milton H. Greene on display at our WEHO Gallery July 16th-24th.”

Sheryl Crow at her home just outside Nashville, TN

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(Ph. David McCliste)

Mick Jagger

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(Ph. Terry O’Neill)

The Supremes, 1965

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(Ph. Art Shay)

“The Supremes “Supremely Tired” by Art Shay, 1965. Getting excited for “Motown The Musical” opening April 28 at The Pantages Theatre in Hollywood, across the street from our W Hotel location. We’ll have a selection of classic Motown photographs on display until the show ends on June 7.”

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